Partenaires

logo Sphere
CNRS
Logo Université Paris-Diderot Logo Université Paris1-Panthéon-Sorbonne


Rechercher

Sur ce site

Sur le Web du CNRS


Accueil > Séminaires en cours > Histoire des sciences, histoire du texte

Axe Interdisciplinarité en Histoire et Philosophie des Sciences

Histoire des sciences, histoire du texte

Responsables : Karine Chemla et l’ensemble du groupe HSHT


Comme les années précédentes, nous y étudierons :
  • comment des sources portent la marque des milieux dans lesquels elles ont été produites,
  • nous poserons la question de la manière dont les documents attestent des savoirs,
  • nous nous intéresserons à l’histoire de l’écriture par compilation,
  • nous mènerons des recherches sur l’organisation que les acteurs ont donnée aux savoirs consignés, en nous penchant sur les parties en lesquelles ils ont structuré leurs textes.

PROGRAMME 2018-2019
Les jeudis, 9:30–17:30, en salle Mondrian, 646A, sauf exception.
Université Paris Diderot, bâtiment Condorcet, 4, rue Elsa Morante, 75013 Paris – plan d’accès.


Accès aux résumés en cliquant sur les dates
25/10/2018
Travailler et retravailler des éléments textuels
Strahil Panayotov The Nineveh Medical Encyclopaedia and similar Compendia
Pan Shuyuan Reading blanks in Chinese woodblock-printed books through mathematics —studying deletions in the Ming edition(s) of Jihe Yuanben, the Chinese Translation of the Elements
Ion Mihailescu Hands, Lines and Arrows : the diagrammatic representation of force

15/11/2018
La fabrication d’outils visuels
Matthieu Husson DISHAS (Digital Information System for the History of Astral Sciences) and diagrams in mathematical astronomy
Norbert Verdier Graver des figures de mathématiques simples, sans enjolivements et pour l’intelligence des problèmes aux XVIIIe et XIXe siècle
Didi van Trijp Swimming on the page : text, illustration and objects in Marcus Élieser Bloch’s oeuvre

20/12/2018, !! salle Klimt, 366A !!
Réflexions sur les dossiers sur lesquels appuyer une étude génétique de texte
Paolo D’Iorio Reconstruction génétique et analyse philosophique d’un aphorisme de Nietzsche
Martha-Cecilia Bustamante Les manuscrits de Jacques Solomon ou les possibilités d’une critique génétique
Emmylou Haffner Une genèse textuelle des Dualgruppen de Dedekind ?

24/01/2019, !! salle Valentin, 454A !!
Ecriture et édition
Andrea Costa Codex scientiae novae. Scientia nova codicis. Leibniz et les manuscrits de physique de l’iter italicum
Stéphane Schmitt L’Encyclopédie méthodique (1782-1832) : approches textuelles
Micheline Decorps L’expression de la personne dans les textes mathématiques grecques

21/02/2019
Publication et diffusion de textes scientifiques
Sietske Fransen Making scientific images : early modern collaborations between artists and scientists
Karine Chemla Que nous disent les éditions anciennes des propriétés diagrammatiques des textes ?
Florence Bretelle-Establet The writing, the publishing, and the circulation of medical texts in late imperial China. Focus on the southern part of the empire, between 1739 and 1909

14/03/2019
On complete works of scientists as texts
Scott Mandelbrote What texts did Newton write ?
David Rabouin Editing Leibniz’ mathematical manuscripts
Cédric Vergnerie La place des cours de Kronecker dans l’édition de ses œuvres complètes

04/04/2019
Comment, historiquement, les sources ont-elles été traitées ?
Edgar Lejeune Logiques de traitement des sources par ordinateur à l’IRHT
Christine Proust Représenter l’écriture cunéiforme : comment transcrire et traduire les signes numériques et métrologiques ?
Julie Lefebvre Quelques remarques sur le divorce entre descriptions des notations écrites numériques et linguistiques dans les « Histoires de l’écriture » du XXe siècle

23/05/2019
Actors’operations with texts
Adeline Reynaud Différents types d’effacements révélant différents types d’intentions mathématiques sur des diagrammes de la période babylonienne ancienne
Uganda Sze Pui KWAN 關詩珮 Text, Collection and Digital Archive : Translating zero and Euclid into China : E.T. R. Moncrieff’s A Treatise of Arithmetic in Hong Kong (1850-1852)
Jean-François Bert Usages et mésusages d’une technologie intellectuelle complexe : la fiche

13/06/2019
Handling writings
Alexis Trouillot What does ‘hisab’ mean ? The perspective of the catalogues of West African Manuscripts
Kevin Baker Practices of reading the Principia
Programme pour l’an prochain



RÉSUMÉS

25 octobre 2018

: : Working and reworking textual elements

  • Strahil Panayotov (Freie Universität Berlin, BabMed - Babylonian Medicine)
    The Nineveh Medical Encyclopaedia and similar Compendia.
    What was the structure of cuneiform medical texts ? When and in what form was cuneiform medicine recorded and systematized ? Can we recognize synchronic and diachronic Mesopotamian medical traditions as well as different editorial workshops ?
    Although multiple medical cuneiform manuscripts from Kuyunjik, Iraq (ancient Nineveh, buried under devastated Mosul) were long known to the Assyriological community, only recently has the structure of these manuscripts been revealed. We know now that there was an important compendium of medical knowledge : the so-called Nineveh Medical Encyclopaedia (henceforth NME), which is a highly systematized collection of diagnoses, therapies (physical and verbal), and herbal based remedies for healing body parts. NME is the best-preserved ancient body of medical lore, predating by several centuries the Hippocratic Corpus. NME was carefully edited during the 7th century BCE by cuneiform scholars, who had access to medical manuscripts from all over Mesopotamia. The Assyrian king, Ashurbanipal had this work be personally created for his Royal Library in Nineveh. Large parts of NME are still not edited, nor translated, therefore NME is largely unknown to historians of ancient medicine and science.
    The present talk, divided in two parts, will address the questions from above on Éthe basis of the NME, ancient catalogues, and other medical compendia. In the first part, it will discuss the structure and the content of the NME in comparison with ancient catalogues. In the second part, it will present additional evidence of similar earlier and later cuneiform editorial works, some of which are not yet edited.
  • Pan Shuyuan (IHNS, CAS, Pékin & SPHERE)
    Reading blanks in Chinese woodblock-printed books through mathematics —studying deletions in the Ming edition(s) of Jihe Yuanben, the Chinese Translation of the Elements.
    The first Chinese translation of the Elements (Books I-VI), titled Jihe Yuanben, was published in 1607. All of its copies printed in the late Ming (i.e., 1607 - 1644) that we have examined can be essentially viewed as deriving from a single edition, although there are a few additions and replacements. However, we can note some blank spaces in all these copies of the Ming edition due to revision. What were the original words in the uncorrected state ? Why were they deleted ? What mathematical understanding did the original translation and the deletions reflect ? Furthermore, when some readers and philologists in the Qing dynasty saw those blanks, what actions did they take for collation and criticism, and what were the considerations behind ? Thanks to mathematics, we are able to read the blanks and discuss these questions above.
  • Ion Mihailescu (MPIWG, Berlin)
    Hands, Lines and Arrows : the diagrammatic representation of force.
    Until the beginning of the 19th century one can encounter only two representations of force : a physical representation that depicted the source of force such as a hand or a weight pulling a rope, and a geometrical representation that depicted the direction and quantity of force as a line. No arrows were ever used to indicate the orientation of force until the early 1800s.
    The use of an arrow in the representation of force might seem to be a convenient, natural or unsurprising notation that would not justify a significant pause. However, it is puzzling that this notation appeared so late in the development of mechanics considering that early-modern publications were nothing short of detailed and innovative diagrams. If for more than two centuries there was no stringent need for depicting the orientation of forces, what changed now ?
    I will aim to show how by following the use of a minor graphical sign one can reveal larger patterns which have meaningful pedagogical and conceptual interpretations.

15 novembre

: : The making of visual tools

  • Matthieu Husson (CNRS, PSL-SYRTE-Observatoire de Paris, France)
    DISHAS (Digital Information System for the History of Astral Sciences) and diagrams in mathematical astronomy.
    The wealth of the visual cultures in the astral sciences has recently attracted the attention of historians of science, and different database projects are currently going on around the world. The challenges they face are important, both in terms of historical analysis and in terms of digital modelling. In the light of this development, each project defines its own goals, its corpus and approaches, and consortiums are in the making where resources and good practices begin to be shared.
    In contrast with other projects that are connected to art history, book history or various heritage institutions, DISHAS is interested in creating relevant digital critical editions and in more mathematical aspects of astronomical practices. Interestingly, diagrams have long been a topic of inquiry in the history of mathematics. Research programs started about 20 years ago to at last explore the various roles diagrams played in mathematical practices (especially those related to proofs), and different digital tools are developed to critically edit them.
    Taking stock on this stimulating context and relying on a corpus of astronomical diagrams from Latin sources I want to begin an exploration of their diversity, their relation to texts and numerical tables, the various ways in which they were produced and the multiplicity of their uses. I hope thus to engage a reflection about how DISHAS could address the challenges of diagrams in relation to the specific characteristics and aims of that digital project.
  • Norbert Verdier (Université Paris-Sud, GHDSO)
    Graver des figures de mathématiques simples, sans enjolivements et pour l’intelligence des problèmes aux XVIIIe et XIXe siècles.
    Dans la première édition de sa Géométrie pratique, en 1693, le sieur de Clermont insiste sur le confort de lecture offert par ses planches « difpofées de manière qu’en lifant on pourra toûjours avoir celle qu’on voudra devant les yeux ». Quelque soixante ans plus tard, en 1755, dans la première édition parisienne, son discours apporte d’autres éclairages même s’il commence, là encore, par critiquer ceux qui font des ouvrages pour le plaisir des yeux mais qui sont, selon lui, sans intérêt ; il ajoute : « Je donne autant de figures qu’il en fant (sic), pour l’intelligence des Problêmes que je propose. Mais elles sont toutes simples & fans enjolivement, parce que je n’ai pas voulu que l’industrie & la peine d’un Graveur, à quoi je n’aurois point eu de part, augmentât le prix de mon Livre ». Ces propos du sieur de Clermont sur les gravures de mathématiques – qui doivent rendre le propos compréhensibles tout en tenant compte des contraintes économiques qu’elles induisent – seront au cœur de nos préoccupations.
    Notre étude – extraite en grande partie d’un chapitre sous presse – porte sur les graveurs de figures mathématiques dans la deuxième moitié du XVIIIe siècle et au XIXe siècle, à une époque où l’édition se spécialise selon les différents champs de connaissances. Après avoir identifié et étudié leurs réalisations dans la production mathématique (journaux et ouvrages), nous tâcherons de reconstituer leur parcours à l’aide de multiples éléments d’archives et proposerons une périodisation afin de mieux saisir l’un des pans techniques de la représentation matérielle des mathématiques. Les graveurs, comme les typographes, sont des acteurs éditoriaux souvent méconnus (certaines planches ne sont pas signées). Nous nous intéresserons, en France, aux productions dominantes de Louis-Joseph Girard (1773-1844), de l’atelier de gravure Adam & Lemaître, d’Eugène-François Wormser (1814-1906) et, pour finir, de Pierre Dulos (1820-1874), sans taire le rôle joué par d’autres graveurs moins présents mais actifs pour présenter et représenter les mathématiques aux différentes strates de lecteurs. Notre texte contribue donc à la compréhension des liens unissant les pratiques mathématiques et leurs manifestations dans les formes de l’écriture scientifique.
  • Didi van Trijp (Leiden University)
    Swimming on the page : text, illustration and objects in Marcus Élieser Bloch’s oeuvre.
    This seminar considers the intricate relationships between object, illustration and textual description in eighteenth-century ichthyology. The paper centers on the oeuvre of Marcus Élieser Bloch (1723–1799), a Jewish physician and naturalist living in Berlin. Bloch authored the Allgemeine Naturgeschichte der Fische (1782–1795), a natural historical series on fishes consisting of twelve lavishly illustrated volumes. The species descriptions in these books were largely based on Bloch’s extensive collection of preserved specimens. Fish species were sent to him from all over the world. I trace the various trajectories through which these specimens passed – with special emphasis on those objects originating from Malabar and dispatched by German missionaries – and examine the different practices and people involved in that process. In examining the various factors contributing to the book’s publication process, I aim to show how object, image and text interacted and how this shaped the knowledge that was transmitted.

20 décembre, !! salle salle Klimt, 366A !!

: : Réflexions sur les dossiers sur lesquels appuyer une étude génétique de texte

  • Paolo D’Iorio (ITEM)
    Reconstruction génétique et analyse philosophique d’un aphorisme de Nietzsche
    Cette communication présente la reconstruction de la genèse à la fois exogène et endogène d’un aphorisme clé de l’ouvrage de Nietzsche intitulé Humain, trop humain. Cela nous permettra de comprendre certaines caractéristiques de l’écriture nietzschéenne ; deuxièmement de saisir le sens philosophique du titre de cette ouvrage ; et finalement d’apprécier les avantages de la méthode génétique comme moyen d’analyse des textes philosophiques.
  • Martha-Cecilia Bustamante (SPHERE & Université Paris Diderot)
    Les manuscrits de Jacques Solomon ou les possibilités d’une critique génétique.
    Dans cet exposé, nous jetterons un regard sur un ensemble de documents manuscrits qui ont appartenus au physicien Jacques Solomon (1908-1942). Ils relèvent de la physique nucléaire et consistent essentiellement en des brouillons. Nous les considérerons dans la perspective d’une analyse génétique. Nous chercherons à savoir dans quelle mesure ces écrits intermédiaires qui avaient sans doute vocation à être remplacés par d’autres plus aboutis permettent de comprendre les rituels et modes de travail du physicien en même temps que sa démarche de théoricien. Aussi, nous interrogerons la spécificité de ces traces dans leur dimension d’objets liés à l’émergence d’idées théoriques sur les interactions entre la matière et le rayonnement. Solomon a fait des exposés sur ce sujet au Collège de France et publié un ouvrage qui nous servira de référence.
  • Emmylou Haffner (Bergische Universität Wuppertal & SPHERE)
    Une genèse textuelle des Dualgruppen de Dedekind ?
    Dans son article "Über Zerlegungen von Zahlen durch ihre größten gemeinsamen Teiler" (1897), le mathématicien Richard Dedekind (1831-1916) décrit la formation du concept de Dualgruppe comme un travail de longue haleine prenant racine dans une réflexion sur certaines propriétés de dualité de sa théorie des modules au cours des années 1870. Dans les archives de Dedekind, conservées à l’université de Göttingen, se trouvent plusieurs centaines de manuscrits contenant plus de vingt années de recherches qui ont ainsi mené, d’après Dedekind lui-même, au nouveau concept de Dualgruppe. Dans cet exposé, nous étudierons la possibilité d’une genèse textuelle des travaux de Dedekind sur les Dualgruppen. Nous nous interrogerons notamment sur la délimitation du dossier génétique, et sur le statut à donner aux phases exploratoires de la recherche mathématique.

24 janvier 2019, !! salle Valentin, 454A !!

  • Andrea Costa (Centre Jean Pépin, UMR 8230)
    Codex scientiae novae. Scientia nova codicis. Leibniz et les manuscrits de physique de l’iter italicum
    La question des spécificités propres à l’édition des textes anciens de mathématiques et de physique n’a, en effet, jamais vraiment été au centre d’expositions méthodologiques systématiques conduisant à l’affirmation d’une casuistique opérative comparable à celle dont les œuvres littéraires et historiques peuvent bénéficier, au moins depuis la fixation/systématisation de l’approche codicologique lachmanienne (1793-1851). 
    Absente des chapitres des grands manuels de référence pour la fondation de la discipline philologique moderne et presque systématiquement contournée par la plupart des débats ecdotiques contemporains, la recherche des critères à adopter pour la sélection des témoignages, la collation des textes et l’établissement des appareils critiques n’a, de facto, jamais dépassé le stade d’un « bricolage savant » dont la réussite ne dépend que de l’ingenium des éditeurs particuliers qui se confrontent à cette étrange famille d’ouvrage. 
    En s’appuyant sur une présentation des éléments codicologiques issus des travaux d’édition - actuellement en cours de réalisation - de la Dynamica de potentia seu de legibus et naturae corporeae de G.W. Leibniz (1691), la communication se propose d’avancer une réflexion plus générale sur les problèmes et les spécificités propres à l’ecdotique des textes scientifiques de l’époque moderne.
  • Stéphane Schmitt (CNRS, SPHERE)
    L’Encyclopédie méthodique (1782-1832) : approches textuelles
    L’Encyclopédie méthodique, conçue initialement par son promoteur, le libraire Charles-Joseph Panckoucke, comme une version simplement mise à jour de l’Encyclopédie de Diderot et d’Alembert, remaniée selon un plan méthodique (elle devait être, en quelque sorte, un dictionnaire de dictionnaires spécialisés), a fini par devenir l’une des plus vastes entreprises éditoriales et encyclopédiques de l’époque moderne. Entamée sous l’Ancien Régime, en 1782, elle n’est achevée qu’en 1832, sous la Monarchie de Juillet et compte alors plus de deux cents volumes de texte et de planches. Cet objet singulier pose de multiples questions : celle du découpage et de l’organisation des connaissances (ordre méthodique versus alphabétique), de la tension entre ouvrage savant et exigence de grande diffusion, de la mise à jour des connaissances au fur et à mesure d’une très longue période de publication, du dialogue entre le texte et les planches parues séparément... Quelques-uns de ces aspects seront évoqués, en particulier en ce qui concerne la partie zoologique de l’Encyclopédie méthodique.
  • Micheline Decorps (SPHERE, & Univ. Clermont-Ferrand)
    L’expression de la personne dans les textes mathématiques grecques
    Dans la littérature mathématique grecque, les références à l’auteur du traité, au lecteur, à l’opérateur qui procède aux constructions entrent dans l’ensemble des procédures codifiées de l’écriture. Il est important de relever les différents modes d’expression, d’étudier les liens entre l’expression de la personne et les parties de texte, et de comprendre pour quelles raisons les habitudes ont évolué selon les époques.

21 février

  • Sietske Fransen (Center for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences, and Humanities (CRASSH), University of Cambridge)
    Making Scientific Images : early modern collaborations between artists and scientists
    The early years of the Royal Society, which was founded in 1660, is known for its visual output. Many modern science enthusiasts, as well as historians of all colours, will have seen images from Robert Hooke’s Micrographia (1665), some of the lunar maps by Johannes Hevelius, or an image of Isaac Newton’s telescope. Despite the fact that several manuals on the making and valuing of early modern engravings were printed under the auspices of the Fellows of the early Royal Society, very little is known about the process of making these images. And even less about the way in which the early modern scientific practitioners worked together with artists to produce images that were useful for scientific purposes.
    On the basis of letters by the Dutch microscopist Antoni van Leeuwenhoek to and from the Royal Society, this seminar will investigate the carefully chosen and carefully developed working relationship between scientist and artist. This includes the awareness for the skills needed to observe specimens and to represent these observations. It will show the strength as well as the restrictions of visual materials in the communication of early modern microscopic experiments.
  • Karine Chemla (CNRS, SPHERE, & Univ. Paris Diderot)
    Que nous disent les éditions anciennes des propriétés diagrammatiques des textes ?
    Dans cet exposé, je discute les propriétés diagrammatiques des textes et l’importance d’en tenir compte pour interpréter ces textes. C’est, pourtant, un point sur lequel les éditions critiques récentes gardent pour l’essentiel le silence. Je plaide donc pour une modification des pratiques philologiques en la matière.
  • Florence Bretelle-Establet (CNRS, SPHERE)
    The writing, the publishing, and the circulation of medical texts in late imperial China. Focus on the southern part of the empire, between 1739 and 1909
    In late imperial China, being involved in medicine often resulted in the willing and effort to convey in written texts medical knowledge and experience. What it meant to write, to publish, to circulate a medical text in southernmost part of the Qing empire is precisely the issue I want to address here, considering medical writings as living objects.

14 mars, salle Mondrian, 646A

: : On complete works of scientists as texts
Workshop organized with Emmylou Haffner and Volker Remmert, in partnership with Wuppertal Universität

  • Scott Mandelbrote (Official Fellow and Director of Studies in History, Peterhouse)
    What texts did Newton write ?
    This paper will consider Newton’s relationship with the publication of his texts and their circulation in both manuscript and print. It will think about circles of reception for some of Newton’s mathematical papers and also for his theological writings, both before and after his death. I will think about the implications of this for the editor and for the presentation of a digital edition of Newton’s works.
  • David Rabouin (SPHERE, CNRS)
    Editing Leibniz’ mathematical manuscripts
    Up to these days, only half of Leibniz’ manuscripts are edited, and only half of this half is edited according to modern scientific standards (around 5000 pages in octavo in the “Akademie Edition”). In this talk, I will recall how the project of editing Leibniz’ Opera underwent many forms after his death in 1716. Such projects included substantial aspects of his mathematics only in the XIXth century. I will explain how it changed the picture of Leibniz’s philosophy and how this picture is still changing according to the ongoing project of a complete edition of Leibniz’ papers and letters (launched at the beginning of the last century).
  • Cédric Vergnerie (Université Paris Diderot, SPHERE)
    La place des cours de Kronecker dans l’édition de ses œuvres complètes
    Entre 1861 et 1891, Kronecker donne à l’université de Berlin des cours dans lesquels il expose, en complément de ses articles, les résultats de ses recherches les plus récentes. Entre la leçon qu’il professe, la prise de note des étudiants et – lorsqu’il existe – le texte publié, de nombreuses étapes sont nécessaires à l’édition d’un tel matériel. Si pour certains cours le processus est arrivé à son terme, d’autres ne sont accessibles que par des manuscrits issus de ces prises de note. Après avoir présenté ces sources, nous allons, à travers l’étude de quelques passages, nous interroger sur le statut que nous pouvons leur attribuer.

4 avril, salle Mondrian, 646A
: : Comment, historiquement, les sources ont-elles été traitées ?

  • Edgar Lejeune (Univ. Paris Diderot, SPHERE & LATTICE)
    Logiques de traitement des sources par ordinateur à l’IRHT
    Depuis 1937, l’Institut de Recherche et d’Histoire des Textes (IRHT) a pour objectif d’identifier et de mettre à disposition des chercheurs les manuscrits médiévaux conservés dans les dépôts publics français et européens. Il s’agit non seulement pour ce laboratoire de donner accès à ces dépouillements de sources, mais aussi d’aider les chercheurs à tirer eux-mêmes le meilleur parti de ce travail en publiant des instruments de travail (inventaires, index, catalogues, glossaires). Dès le début des années 70, du fait du développement des méthodes informatiques, certains chercheurs de l’IRHT envisagent d’atteindre ce but de "manière plus exhaustive", en confectionnant par exemple des programmes informatiques adaptés à tel ou tel type de sources. Dans un article publié en 1978 dans Computer and the humanities, Lucie Fossier présente trois de ces programmes développés par la section Informatique de l’IRHT et destinés aux historiens médiévistes.
    Comment ces programmes sont-ils conçus ? Qu’est-ce qu’ils permettent ? A quels types de sources sont-ils adaptés ? Quelles fonctions remplissent-ils que les anciens instruments de travail ne remplissaient pas ? et donc, en quoi permettent-ils un accès aux sources "plus exhaustif" ?
    Pour répondre à ces questions, nous montrerons tout d’abord comment la conception de ces programmes s’intègre dans la continuité d’une tradition de traitement des sources à l’IRHT (typologie des sources, manuels de dépouillement et de fabrication des instruments de travail). Nous comparerons ensuite ces instruments de travail d’un nouveau genre avec d’autres, plus anciens et produits sans ordinateurs, comme les index et les glossaires par exemple.
  • Christine Proust (CNRS, SPHERE)
    Représenter l’écriture cunéiforme : comment transcrire et traduire les signes numériques et métrologiques ?
    Les textes mathématiques qui ont été écrits en signes cunéiformes au Proche Orient entre les 3e et 1er millénaires avant l’ère commune présentent une grande variété de systèmes de représentation des nombres et des quantités. Certains de ces systèmes n’ont pas d’équivalent moderne, et les notations anciennes interrogent la notion même de nombre ou de quantité. Comment représenter ces systèmes dans les écritures alphabétiques et les langues modernes ? Au travers d’études de cas, cet exposé explorera quelques aspects de cette question et des réponses qui lui ont été données dans l’historiographie.
  • Julie Lefebvre (Univ. Paris Diderot, SPHERE)
    Quelques remarques sur le divorce entre descriptions des notations écrites numériques et linguistiques dans les « Histoires de l’écriture » du XXe siècle
    L’intervention que nous proposons s’inscrit dans un questionnement large portant sur les descriptions des systèmes sémiologiques que sont les écritures et sur les incidences de ces descriptions sur la compréhension de l’écrit et plus particulièrement du texte écrit.
    En l’occurrence, on s’interrogera sur le divorce remarquable dont font l’objet les traitements des notations des valeurs numériques et des valeurs linguistiques dans des descriptions de l’écriture faisant partie de l’ensemble foisonnant constitué par les ouvrages ayant pour projet de retracer une « Histoire de l’écriture », publiés entre 1900 et 2015 dans les espaces francophone, germanophone et anglo-saxon.
    Ce faisant, notre objectif sera de poser un premier jalon permettant de remonter à la source de cette séparation dont la persistance actuelle est d’autant plus surprenante qu’il s’oppose à l’expérience du scripteur, amené à manipuler indistinctement dans sa pratique de l’écrit « des chiffres et des lettres » ou encore des unités écrites dévolues à la notation de valeurs numériques et de valeurs linguistiques.

23 mai, salle Mondrian, 646A
: : Actors’operations with texts

  • Adeline Reynaud (Université Paris Diderot, SPHERE)
    Différents types d’effacements révélant différents types d’intentions mathématiques sur des diagrammes de la période vieux-babylonienne
    Plusieurs diagrammes mathématiques que l’on trouve sur des tablettes d’argile cunéiformes d’époque paléo-babylonienne (début du deuxième millénaire avant notre ère) présentent des traces d’effacement, de natures assez différentes les unes des autres. Dans cet exposé, je tenterai de clarifier les indices qui nous permettent de détecter qu’il y a eu effacement et comment cet effacement a été opéré. Puis je m’interrogerai, en présentant une sélection de tablettes, sur les différentes intentions qui semblent avoir donné lieu à ces effacements et ce que l’identification de ces intentions peut nous apprendre sur le rôle des diagrammes concernés : effacement d’une erreur pour la corriger, effacement d’un exercice terminé pour le remplacer par un autre, effacement d’une partie de la solution d’un problème pour la donner à retrouver à un élève, effacement de tracés auxiliaires à des fins esthétiques, ...
  • Uganda Sze Pui KWAN 關詩珮 (School of Humanities, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore & NRI, Cambridge)
    Text, Collection and Digital Archive : Translating zero and Euclid into China : E.T. R. Moncrieff’s A Treatise of Arithmetic in Hong Kong (1850-1852)
    Early 19th century was an overlooked period in the discussion of translating western mathematics and science into China. Previous works have studied the translation of Euclid by missionaries in the Ming Dynasty and the full-fledged transmission of science during the Self-strengthening movement after 1861. The paper will center on a translator and a curriculum designer, Reverend E. T. R. Moncrieff, a protestant missionary who tutored at Hong Kong St. Paul’s College in the 1850s for the transmission of mathematics into modern China. St Paul’s College was a cradle of Chinese modernization with which many advocates of western knowledge, such as Reverend John Fryer (translator, educator) , Wang Tao (reformer, political columnist), Reverend James Summers (early British Sinologist), Ng Tingfang (diplomat), were once affiliated.
    Moncrieff went to HK with the mission to teach general subjects to young Chinese children. Upon his arrival, he was frustrated by the primitive teaching conditions. Books, libraries, textbook, were lacking, all of which were basic to education. But what was more alarming than the physical and material deficiencies was his incapability of writing zero with the Chinese hair pen (Maobi 毛筆) . No one in his class could write a sturdy, balanced and perfect round shape. This reflected a more deep-seated epistemological concern “Did the Chinese have the concept of zero ? “ If no, how could mathematical formulas be conceived, calculated, or conveyed ? Moncrieff decided to print a textbook with numerical formulas, mathematical concepts, and charts. Before the printing machine was run, he was confronted with a more fundamental dilemma. How should he translate numerical concepts into Chinese since his textbook was designed for Chinese people ?
    The paper will be the first in academia to focus on Moncrieff’s contributions, particularly his idiosyncratic and sinicized translation method of Euclid and his use of the printing technology to overcome the epistemological conundrum triggered by writing instrument and problems of translation. In the talk, we will close read the textbook of Moncrieff ; and will also introduce the Church Missionary Society Records from which Moncrieff’s and other missionaries’ (such as Reverend Karl Gützlaff) records could be found.
  • Jean-François Bert (Université de Lausanne, Collège des Humanités - EPFL)
    Usages et mésusages d’une technologie intellectuelle complexe : la fiche
    Couper, ranger, écrire, manipuler, feuilleter, intercaler, extraire, trier : voici sans doute quelques uns des gestes routiniers et machinaux opérés par les ficheurs depuis le XVIIIe siècle. Humble et répétitive, machinale et parfois compulsive, la mise en fiche est une activité qui traversa les mondes savants avec une inattendue constance, offrant pour beaucoup d’usagers des solutions inespérées à leur problèmes de classement, de catégorisation, ou encore de hiérarchisation. Nous reprendrons ici trois cas de ficheurs. Le premier, celui du mathématicien et physicien genevois Georges Louis Le sage (1724-1803) et de ses 35 000 cartes à jouer qu’il va transformer, en plus de cinquante ans, en un véritable système. Un fichier, tout fichier, est d’abord un investissement à long terme. Le second, celui de l’historien et archéologue Henri Hubert (1872-1927) et de ses 15 000 fiches à partir desquelles il pourra revendiquer certains choix thématiques qui vont impliquer des sélections autant que des exclusions. Enfin, celui de Michel Foucault (1926-1984) qui utilisa son fichier, en particulier pour Les Mots et les choses (1966), comme une carte dessinant des parcours, des traversées, des raccourcis, ou encore des sauts.

13 juin, salle Mondrian, 646A
: : Handling writings

  • Alexis Trouillot (Université Paris Diderot, SPHERE)
    What does ‘hisab’ mean ? The perspective of the catalogues of West African Manuscripts
    The Arabic term ‘hisab’ is generally translated as ‘arithmetics’.
    In this talk, I propose to explore what this term meant in a West African context in a period starting from the 17th century and ending in the 20th century, by using an array of regional catalogs covering a region, a period, and a volume rather original for the history of mathematics in Arabic.
    I will first summarise what is known of the beginning of manuscript culture in the region before detailing the numerous catalogues pertaining to Arabic manuscripts. As will quickly become apparent from this description, the different cataloguing actors, ranging from the French colonial government to Unesco to an informal association of American researchers, had different ideas on how to catalog manuscripts, and in particular on how to divide them into genres and subjects, forcing us to radically shift methodology from one catalog to the other and to ask the question of what kind of access to the text a catalog can offer.
    Lastly, I will show that the catalogs hint at a curriculum for the study of ‘hisab’ in West Africa. Beyond the translation as ‘arithmetics’, ‘hisab’ seems to articulate itself around, and at times to be merging with, two other disciplines : astronomy (‘falak’) and inheritance (‘fara’id’).
  • Kevin Baker (Oxford University Press)
    Practices of Reading the Principia
    Given its status as a foundational text of modern science, remarkably little is known about how the Principia was read when it was published in 1687. Which individuals worked through its notoriously difficult proofs, in what order, to what ends, and when, have never been systematically established. The dissemination of Newton’s philosophy has been debated for over three hundred years, but how contemporaries engaged with his book at the time of publication – what the act of reading the Principia involved – has received surprisingly little scholarly attention.
  • discussion sur le programme de l’an prochain







INFORMATIONS PRATIQUES



Bâtiment Condorcet, Université Paris Diderot, 10 rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, 75013 - Paris*. Plan.
Calculer votre itinéraire avec le site de la RATP

Metro : lignes 14 and RER C, arrêt : Bibliothèque François Mitterrand ou ligne 6, arrêt : Quai de la gare. Bus : 62 and 89 (arrêt : Bibliothèque rue Mann), 325 (arrêt : Watt), 64 (arrêt : Tolbiac-Bibliothèque François Mitterrand)