Partenaires

logo Sphere
CNRS
Logo Université Paris-Diderot Logo Université Paris1-Panthéon-Sorbonne


Search

On this website

On the whole CNRS Web


Home > Seminars > History of Science, History of Text

Axis Interdisciplinary Research in History and Philosophy of Science

History of Science, History of Text

Organizers: Karine Chemla (CNRS, SPHERE) & the HSHT Group.

The seminar examines the various types of documents produced in the context of scholarly practices in order to understand how the shaping of textual forms and inscriptions is part of the scientific activity. The seminar also aims to understand how these works make it possible to better interpret the sources on which historians of science draw to conduct their research. We will focus this year on the following topics:

  • how are layouts instruments that scientists put into play in their work and do they need to be interpreted as such?
  • How to read diagrams?
  • how do the writings and inscriptions produced in one environment circulate and how are they taken up in other milieux?
  • How can we document the genesis of texts, calculations, textual forms, and what does it tell us about the modes of writing practiced in various contexts?
  • How do the sources document what they do not talk about?
  • What does the organization of the writings of the actors tell us about their scholarly activities?



SCHEDULE 2019-2020

November 14 December 12 January 16, 2020 February 6 March 5 April 2 May 7 June 18

On Thursdays, from 9:30am till 5:30pm.

University of Paris (Diderot), Building Condorcet, 4, rue Elsa Morante, 75013 Paris – Campus map with access.


Abstracts available on clicking on dates


11/14/2019, Room 646A


Shaping and reshaping scholarly texts 1

Nick Jacobson Ordering Language to Order the Heavens: A View of Alfonsine Astronomical Canons at the Level of the Manuscript
Hsien-chun Wang Preliminary thoughts on the pictorial errors of the Illustrated Treatise on the Marvellous Machines of the Far West (Yuanxi qiqi tushuo ) (1672)
Jacob Olley Ottoman Texts on the Science of Music

12/12/2019, Room 646A


Reading Textual Records

Arilès Remaki La découverte du triangle harmonique chez Leibniz : un exemple d’application de la génétique en histoire des mathématiques
Alban da Silva Le texte ethnographique comme source de l’ethnomathématicien
Qiong Zhang Archiving a Community of Science in Seventeenth-Century China: A Look at the Textual Record

01/162020, Room 646A


Shaping and reshaping scholarly texts 2

He BIAN Ordering Language to Order the Heavens: A View of Alfonsine Astronomical Canons at the Level of the Manuscript
Edgar Lejeune Comment le comité de rédaction d’une publication peut-il provoquer l’apparition d’un genre de texte? Le cas du bulletin de liaison Le Médiéviste et l’ordinateur
Marie Lacomme Déceler une position philosophique dans une publication scientifique : le cas de la frontière homme-animal en éthologie (1960-2000)

02/06/2020, Room 646A


Diagrams 1

Julie Lefebvre tba
Adeline Reynaud Techniques et procédures de tracé des diagrammes mathématiques à l’époque paléo-babylonienne
Micheline Decorps Sur la relation entre texte et figure dans les traités mathématiques et techniques grecs : étude de quelques exemples

03/05/2020, Room 646A
Working with and Interpreting Columns
Christine Proust Sémantique des colonnes dans quelques textes mathématiques cunéiformes
Agathe Keller La colonne comme outil de calcul dans les commentaires mathématiques en Sanskrit: avec ou sans sens?
Emmylou Haffner Mise en page des brouillons mathématiques : colonnes, colonnes et colonnes

04/02/2020, Room 646A


Texts in pieces

Stéphane Schmitt Les encyclopédies spécialisées au 18e siècle. L’exemple de l’histoire naturelle et de la médecine
Martha Cecilia Bustamante Géométries non archimédiennes selon un procédé d’écriture du physicien Jacques Solomon
Florence Bretelle-Establet Notes marginales, commentaires et ajouts : les multiples interventions dans les textes de médecine en Chine à la fin de l’empire (17e-19e siècles)

05/07/2020, Room 646A


Organizing texts

Andrea Costa De la taxinomie à l’encyclopédie : les plans d’ouvrages dans la production de G.W. Leibniz
Alexis Trouillot What does ‘hisab’ mean? The perspective of the catalogues of West African Manuscripts
Thomas Morel Écrire, dessiner et prêcher des pratiques mathématiques dans les mines de l’époque moderne

06/18/2020, Room 646A


Diagrams 2

Alexei Volkov tba
Samuel Gessner Between astronomical diagrams and instruments: spatializing numerical data of astronomical tables
Discussion on the program for next year


ABSTRACTS

November 14, 2019, Room 646A
:: Shaping and reshaping scholarly texts 1

  • Nick Jacobson (SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris)
    Ordering Language to Order the Heavens:
    A View of Alfonsine Astronomical Canons at the Level of the Manuscript

    From the fourteenth century until the middle of the sixteenth, most practitioners of medieval Latin astronomy relied, at least in part, upon a set of tables composed in Toledo and named after their patron, King Alfonso X of Castile (r. 1252-1284). As these tables circulated, they were often accompanied by a set of rules, known as canons, that instructed the reader in how to perform a variety of operations in positional astronomy. In the contemporary scholarly literature, canons are often treated peripherally as a set of instructions to be mastered by novices, and then set aside. From the perspective of the historical actors, however, the canons were integral to astronomical practice. They provided an organizing structure and hierarchy of language that played a crucial role in imparting practical knowledge. Astronomers who wrote canons frequently commented on the novelty, clarity, or utility of the order (ordinatio) and compilation (compilatio) of their work. In this presentation, I focus on the authors of two Latin canon texts: Jean de Murs (d. ca. 1355) who worked in a French context, and Nicholas of Aquaeductu (fl. 1410) who was Italian. I argue that Jean de Murs and Nicholas of Aquaeductu adapted the conventions of ordinatio and compilatio, which were shared across a variety of learned communities in medieval Europe, to the canons. Using these conventions, the authors sought to clarify and synthesize large bodies of material using technical language and manuscript formatting as ordering technologies. In the light of this interpretation, I argue that ordinatio and compilatio are useful analytical categories even when canon sets express great variation across manuscript witnesses.
  • Hsien-chun WANG (Ts’ing-hua University, Taiwan)
    Preliminary thoughts on the pictorial errors of the Illustrated Treatise on the Marvellous Machines of the Far West(Yuanxi qiqi tushuo) (1672)
    One of the most fascinating cases in the history of the transmission of scientific and technological knowledge between China and Europe is the book Qiqi tushuo (1672). It was co-authored by the Jesuit Johannes Schreck (Terrenz or Terrentius Constantiensis) and the Chinese scholar-official Wang Zheng (1571-1644) on the basis of several European scientific and technological treatises, including Simon Stevin’s (1548-1620) Hypomnemata Mathematica (1608), Galileo Galilei’s Le Mecaniche (1600), Agostino Ramelli’s Le Diverse e Artificiose Machine del Capitano (1588), and Vittorio Zonca’s Novo Teatro di Machine et Edificii (1607). Historians of science and technology have noticed the discrepancies between the Qiqi tushuo illustrations and their European sources, debating on the implications of the errors. Some argue that they are the evidence of lack of visual thinking among Chinese artisans, and hence the proof of China’s lack of technological revolution. Yet, it is highly likely that the errors were just common editorial errors because the author Wang Zheng had never had the chance to correct them before his manuscript was turned into a woodblock-printed book. After its publication in 1672, the book was popular among Chinese literati and was reprinted and hand-copied in the following two centuries. The history of the errors told us more about how the images of novel machines were appreciated in China before modern times than the shaky argument of visual thinking or mental imaging in technological changes.
  • Jacob Olley (Universität Münster)
    Ottoman Texts on the Science of Music
    This seminar will explore the ‘science of music’ (‘ilm-i mûsîkî) as manifested in Ottoman Turkish texts written between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries. I will introduce some of the key Ottoman writings on music, and situate them within the larger context of Islamic approaches to systematic knowledge. I will focus on music treatises as a textual genre, in order to illuminate the literary conventions that shape the Ottoman discourse on music, as well as other devices used to convey musical information, such as tables, diagrams, illustrations, and notation. The seminar will discuss the main theoretical aspects of music treatises, including taxonomy and nomenclature, acoustics and mathematics, cosmology and other extra-musical associations, and the psycho-physical effects of music. At the same time, it will highlight the relationship between theoretical and practical knowledge, and the role of texts in music pedagogy, transmission, and performance. In this way, I will discuss how the multiple functions of musical texts relate to the historical and social environments in which they were produced and consumed..

December 12, Room 646A

:: Reading Textual Records

  • Arilès Remaki (Université de Paris (Diderot), SPHERE)
    La découverte du triangle harmonique chez Leibniz : un exemple d’application de la génétique en histoire des mathématiques
    Bien que les connaissances mathématiques de Leibniz en 1672 (âgé de 26 ans) soient très rudimentaires, il attire néanmoins l’attention du grand Huygens qui lui pose durant l’été le problème suivant : calculer la somme infinie des inverses des nombres triangulaires. Parmi le nombre considérable de brouillons mathématiques de Leibniz qui nous parvenus, on trouve les travaux que le jeune philosophe a consacré à cette question et qui l’ont mené vers l’une des grandes découvertes de son séjour à Paris (1672-1676) : le triangle harmonique. L’étude de ce petit corpus pose des problèmes qui sont au coeur d’enjeux actuels de l’historiographie de mathématiques, à savoir l’interprétation de brouillons de calculs. Ces questions, déjà délicates lorsqu’il s’agit de calculs formels ou algébriques, sont d’autant plus importante ici, dans le contexte de la combinatoire du XVIIe siècle, où les tables jouent le rôle d’outil de calcul et mélangent les exemples et les cas généraux, les expositions et les applications, les données et les résultats.
  • Alban da Silva (IREM de Nouvelle-Calédonie)
    Le texte ethnographique comme source de l’ethnomathématicien
    L’ethnomathématique s’est progressivement structuré en un champ disciplinaire tout au long du 20e siècle à la faveur de plusieurs travaux en ethnologie. Quelques textes, rédigés par des ethnographes, permettent de questionner la dimension mathématique de certaines activités culturelles liées à la fabrication d’artefacts (vannerie, nattes, jeux de fils…). Parmi ceux-ci, un article « Geometrical drawings from Malekula and other islands of the New Hebride » (Deacon-1934) consacré à une pratique de dessin sur le sable du Vanuatu a suscité l’intérêt d’une mathématicienne, Marcia Ascher, qui a montré à la fin des années 80 que cette pratique était riche « d’idées mathématiques ». Dans un premier temps, je présenterai ce texte et les résultats ethnomathématiques qu’une nouvelle lecture a permis de mettre au jour. Ensuite, à partir de l’exemple d’un corpus original de dessins des îles de Maewo et de Pentecoste, je montrerai comment l’analyse de l’ethnomathématicien peut être avantageusement complétée par des données de première main, enregistrées selon une méthodologie dédiée.
  • Qiong ZHANG (Associate Professor of Chinese History, Wake Forest University, USA, International Visiting Fellow at IKGF, FAU, Germany)
    Archiving a Community of Science in Seventeenth-Century China: A Look at the Textual Record
    I want to examine three key texts representing Chinese intellectuals’ creative engagement with Jesuit science in the seventeenth century, all products of the Fang School (Fang Yizhi, his sons and disciples). I want to focus on the intertextuality and the interweaving of different voices in these three works and to highlight the new concepts, research methodology and language of science that grew in this community as reflected in these texts.

January 16, 2020, Room 646A

:: Shaping and reshaping scholarly texts 2

  • He BIAN (Princeton University)
    Reading Medical Recipe Collections in Eighteenth-Century China: Textual Migrations and Contextual Mutations
    The genre of fang (recipes) constituted the largest component of China’s pre-modern medical corpus, and yet the sheer volume and variety of text are still poorly understood historically. In this talk, I will examine Huisheng ji, a book of medical recipes and self-help techniques collected and published by a military commander of eighteenth-century China, as an example of non-expert uses of formulaic literature. I am interested in the ways in which recipes (fang) migrated from experience to text, mutated between different collections, and took on completely different meanings when placed in distinct contexts.
  • Edgar Lejeune (Université de Paris (Diderot),SPHERE, et Paris Sorbonne Nouvelle, LATTICE)
    Comment le comité de rédaction d’une publication peut-il provoquer l’apparition d’un genre de texte? Le cas du bulletin de liaison Le Médiéviste et l’ordinateur
    En 1979 est créée la première publication spécifiquement consacrée aux usages des ordinateurs en histoire médiévale : Le Médiéviste et l’ordinateur. Son objectif affiché est de permettre la création d’un réseau de chercheurs autour des usages de l’informatique. A cette fin, des stratégies de publication sont mises en place. Elles portent sur le choix de la forme « bulletin de liaison » ou sur l’injonction faite aux auteurs de publier des documents de travail. Je m’intéresserai aux conséquences de ces choix sur la forme des articles de cette publication.
    Pour les comprendre, nous devrons nous pencher sur le contenu de cette publication de plus près (son type, son organisation interne, sa langue), mais aussi sur les pratiques de ses éditeurs, à savoir : comment ils choisissent, relisent et retravaillent les articles. Nous nous intéresserons aux différentes stratégies de publications que les éditeurs du Médiéviste et l’ordinateur mettent en place, en analysant le contexte de publication aussi bien que les aspects langagiers du bulletin. La thèse que je défendrai pose qu’un sous-genre d’article particulier apparaît au sein de ce bulletin, en lien avec les objectifs spécifiques que les éditeurs poursuivent.
  • Marie Lacomme (Université de Paris (Diderot), SPHERE)
    Déceler une position philosophique dans une publication scientifique : le cas de la frontière homme-animal en éthologie (1960-2000)
    Les publications scientifiques, et notamment les articles parus dans des revues, répondent à des règles formelles relativement précises et strictes, qui laissent en général peu de place à l’expression directe d’opinions personnelles.
    Peut-on cependant déduire la position philosophique d’un auteur d’après un de ses articles scientifiques ? C’est à cette interrogation et à tous les questionnements méthodologiques qui lui sont liés que je réfléchirai lors de cette présentation. Je m’appuierai pour cela sur une étude de cas tirée de ma thèse, dans laquelle j’essaie de comprendre quelles conceptions de la frontière ontologique entre l’homme et l’animal fondent le travail des chercheurs en éthologie (étude scientifique du comportement animal)

February 6, Room 646A

:: Diagrams 1

  • Julie Lefebvre (University Paris-Ouest-Nanterre, MoDyCo, UMR 7114)
    Quelques remarques sur l’articulation d’un diagramme à une ligne écrite : typologie et enjeux interprétatifs
    Nous reviendrons tout d’abord sur l’appellation de « diagramme » en convoquant des éléments lexicographiques et étymologiques, mais également en la confrontant à d’autres dénominations telles que « figure », « schéma » ou encore « illustration » qui désignent couramment, dans un texte donné, des entités à dimension iconique articulées à une chaîne de signes graphiques —une linéarité écrite. Sur la base d’un corpus de textes contemporains relevant de genres discursifs variés, nous proposerons ensuite de poser les bases d’une typologie linguistique de l’articulation entre un diagramme et la ligne écrite à laquelle il est relié. On s’interrogera ainsi sur la nature des éléments associés dans cette mise en relation et sur les ressources, notamment syntaxiques, référentielles et ponctuationnelles, qu’elle met en jeu. Ce faisant, nous essaierons de montrer comment les différentes modalités de l’articulation entre une ligne graphique et un diagramme conditionnent l’interprétation du texte que, dans leur association, ils constituent.
  • Adeline Reynaud (University of Paris (Diderot), SPHERE)
    Techniques et procédures de tracé des diagrammes mathématiques à l’époque paléo-babylonienne
    Quelques dizaines de tablettes mathématiques produites en Mésoptoamie à l’époque paléo-babylonienne (début du deuxième millénaire avant notre ère) contiennent un ou plusieurs diagrammes dessinés dans l’argile en complément ou à la place d’un texte discursif. Si ces diagrammes peuvent être analysés en tant qu’objets mathématiques sur la base de la riche tradition qui leur est consacrée en histoire et philosophie des sciences, ils peuvent également être étudiés comme dessins d’un type particulier en adaptant à leur cas spécifique des études assyriologiques dédiées à la matérialité de l’écriture cunéiforme. Dans cet exposé, je proposerai ainsi quelques tentatives de reconstitution de la manière dont ces diagrammes mathématiques étaient tracés, ce qui me semble être un élément à part entière des pratiques mathématiques liées à ces objets, et quelques analyses de ce que la connaissance de cet aspect peut nous apprendre sur la conception des figures géométriques représentées. Je me pencherai ce faisant sur deux aspects différents de la réalisation des diagrammes : d’une part leurs "techniques de tracé", c’est-à-dire les outils et les gestes permettant de les dessiner, et d’autre part leurs "procédures de tracé", c’est-à-dire les éventuelles séquences routinières d’étapes mises en œuvre lors de leur production.
  • Micheline Decorps (University Blaise Pascal, Clermont II)
    Sur la relation entre texte et figure dans les traités mathématiques et techniques grecs : étude de quelques exemples [2nd part]
    À la lumière des études menées sur les diagrammes et les problèmes posés par leur interprétation, on apportera ici quelques éléments concrets empruntés à certains textes mathématiques et techniques de l¹Antiquité grecque. Dans cette approche on donnera une importance particulière aux différents aspects à la fois matériels et intellectuels de la relation entre le texte et la figure.

March 5, Room 646A
:: Working with and Interpreting Columns

  • Christine Proust (SPHERE, CNRS & University of Paris (Diderot))
    Sémantique des colonnes dans quelques textes mathématiques cunéiformes
    Certain textes mathématiques cunéiformes se présentent sous la forme de listes ou de tables sans autre forme d’explication qui nous renseignerait sur leur signification ou leur mode d’emploi. Cependant, ces textes comportent des alignements verticaux qui semblent intentionnels. Dans quelle mesure ces éléments de mise en page suppléent-ils à l’absence d’explication ? Peut-on déceler une sémantique des alignements dans ces textes ?
  • Agathe Keller (CNRS, SPHERE, & University of Paris (Diderot))
    The columns as a computational tool in Sanskrit mathematical commentaries: with or without meaning?
    In the representations of working surfaces that Sanskrit mathematical commentaries include in their texts, as well as in the names given to certain algorithms and to configurations in an algorithm, columns (vallī lit. creeper) appear. In two case studies I would like to observe how the column works as a formal tool in the execution of procedures: it is a configuration that has a meaning at the beginning of the computation and in the end, but in its intermediary steps it works seemingly like an algebraic symbolism, enabling one to execute computations without having to worry about their meanings. Or is it so? My presentation will take examples from Pṛthūdhaka (fl. 860)’s commentary on the mathematical chapter of the Theoretical astronomical treatise of the true Brāhma School (Brāhmasphuṭasiddhānta-628) dealing with fractions and combinatorics mirroring them with other uses of columns in the same context.
  • Emmylou Haffner (University Paris-Sud)
    Mise en page des brouillons mathématiques : colonnes, colonnes et colonnes
    Dans les brouillons de mathématiciens, les organisations spatiales des écritures se démarquent souvent du texte imprimé rectangulaire et propre que l’on a coutume de lire. Une récurrence de ces organisations spatiales est l’utilisation de colonnes. Nous verrons, sur une sélection d’exemples, que plusieurs manières d’utiliser les colonnes cohabitent dans de tels textes, chacune donnant des indications différentes sur les pratiques mathématiques au brouillon et sur certaines temporalités de la recherche.

April 2, Room 646A

:: Texts in pieces

  • Stéphane Schmitt (Archives Henri Poincaré)
    Les encyclopédies spécialisées au 18e siècle. L’exemple de l’histoire naturelle et de la médecine
    Il est bien connu que le 18e siècle a vu l’essor d’une grande tradition encyclopédique, représentée notamment par l’Encyclopédie de Diderot et d’Alembert, mais aussi par de nombreuses autres (Cyclopaedia de Chambers, Dictionnaire de Trévoux, etc.). Plusieurs de ces ouvrages, qui ont en commun d’être généralistes, ont été soigneusement étudiés par les historiens. Mais parallèlement, un très grand nombre d’encyclopédies spécialisées, c’est-à-dire restreintes à un champ particulier, ont été publiées au cours de la même époque. Cette littérature, qui a été très largement diffusée, a joué un rôle important dans l’histoire de chaque discipline concernée. Je présenterai ici quelques exemples dans le domaine de l’histoire naturelle et de la médecine.
  • Martha Cecilia Bustamante (SPHERE & University of Paris (Diderot))
    Géométries non archimédiennes selon un procédé d’écriture du physicien Jacques Solomon
    Entre 1939 et 1941, Jacques Solomon (1908-1942) a porté un regard aigu sur les géométries non archimédiennes. Nous nous intéresserons aux documents qui sont restés dans la perspective de la génétique des textes et des procédés d’écriture mis en jeu par le scripteur. Nous montrerons comment Solomon rassemble des travaux publiés depuis la fin du XIXe siècle, et, sur cette base, met en place une écriture par fragments impliquant des auteurs et des sources très diverses. Dans le regard que Solomon porte sur le sujet, le travail du mathématicien italien Veronese a une place de premier plan. Enfin, l’analyse que nous faisons des documents en question montre que comprendre les implications épistémologiques du type d’écriture que Solomon met en œuvre est un enjeu essentiel.
  • Florence Bretelle-Establet (CNRS, SPHERE, &University of Paris (Diderot))
    Notes marginales, commentaires et ajouts : les multiples interventions dans les textes de médecine en Chine à la fin de l’empire (17e-19e siècles)
    Augmentés de notes marginales manuscrites, de notes marginales imprimées, de commentaires, de nouveaux morceaux ou de nouvelles préfaces, les textes médicaux en Chine, à la fin de l’empire, attestent de multiples interventions non auctoriales. Nous mettrons en lumière les différents types d’interventions qui accompagnent les textes de médecine, dès leur première édition, et celles qui s’ajoutent lors de nouvelles éditions et nous tenterons d’en saisir les enjeux.

May 7, Room 646A
:: Organizing texts

  • Andrea (CNRS, Centre Jean-Pépin UMR 8230)
    De la taxinomie à l’encyclopédie : les plans d’ouvrages dans la production de G.W. Leibniz
    Les pages des volumes de l’édition nationale allemande des œuvres de G.W. Leibniz s’avèrent parsemées d’inventaires, catalogues, taxinomies, énumérations et répertoires bibliographiques à travers lesquels se définit la cartographie globale de l’énorme projet encyclopédique que le philosophe d’Hanovre poursuivit tout au long de sa vie. Condensée dans la dimension minimale de la « liste » ou développée jusqu’à atteindre l’ampleur d’un ouvrage autonome et articulé, la pratique de l’inventaire se révèle ainsi comme le noyau originaire structurant le dispositif de la réflexion leibnizienne ainsi que sa pratique d’écriture. La communication se propose d’étudier l’évolution des lignes directrices du projet encyclopédique leibnizien à partir de ses ébauches taxinomiques, à travers l’analyse d’une série d’exemples tirés des œuvres publiées et des manuscrits inédits.
  • Alexis Trouillot (University of Paris (Diderot), SPHERE)
    What does ‘hisab’ mean? The perspective of the catalogues of West African Manuscripts
    In this talk, I propose to explore what this term meant in a West African context in a period starting from the 17th century and ending in the 20th century, by using an array of regional catalogs covering a region, a period, and a volume rather original for the history of mathematics in Arabic.
    I will first summarise what is known of the beginning of manuscript culture in the region before detailing the numerous catalogues pertaining to Arabic manuscripts. As will quickly become apparent from this description, the different cataloguing actors, ranging from the French colonial government to Unesco to an informal association of American researchers, had different ideas on how to catalog manuscripts, and in particular on how to divide them into genres and subjects, forcing us to radically shift methodology from one catalog to the other and to ask the question of what kind of access to the text a catalog can offer.
    Lastly, I will show that the catalogs hint at a curriculum for the study of ‘hisab’ in West Africa. Beyond the translation as ‘arithmetics’, ‘hisab’ seems to articulate itself around, and at times to be merging with, two other disciplines: astronomy (falak) and inheritance (fara’id)
    .
  • Thomas Morel
    Writing, drawing and preaching mathematical practices
 in early modern mines
    Subterranean geometry developed during the early modern period around a set of concrete technical problems, in specific cultural and religious settings. In the second half of the sixteenth century, scholars published their view on this craft, most famously Georg Agricola (1494–1555) with this De Re Metallica. However, one can dig up other sources to understand these geometrical practices: mining laws and customs, sketches and technical documents used by practitioners. Mining sermons, which developed with the rise of protestantism, offer another – and diverging – conception of underground surveying. Which methodology can be used to cross-reference sources that can tend to be contradictory? How to cope with the heterogeneity between a scholarly approach and traces of concrete practices, an acute problem concerning mathematics? Can we then reach more general conclusions about the scope and role of early modern practical mathematics?

June 18, Room 646A
:: Diagrams 2

  • Samuel Gessner (SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris)
    Between astronomical diagrams and instruments: spatializing numerical data of astronomical tables
    Astronomers have connected their computational methods with geometrical representations in various ways. The ways these connections were elaborated on are not universal, but historically contingent of the local astronomical practice. Parchment instruments to graphically determine (approximate) positions of the planets, i.e. the family of planetary “equatoria” instruments, saw renewed developments in the 15th century. We will start with a European case study about a particular type of instrument that emerged in manuscripts from Erfurt and Leipzig termed “Theorice novelle”. In discussing this material the talk proposes to look into possible connections between the representation of computed data in tables and corresponding diagrammatic representations on the “Theorice novelle” and similar instruments. More generally, it raises the question of how the use of tables was preparing the minds for experimenting with new types of instruments and whether this trait can be used to characterise a specific astronomical practice.
  • discussion on the program for next year







VENUE



Building Condorcet, University Paris Diderot, 4, rue Elsa Morante, 75013 - Paris*. Plan.
Calculate your itinerary with RATP

Metro : lines 14 and RER C, stop: Bibliothèque François Mitterrand ou ligne 6, stop: Quai de la gare. Bus: 62 and 89 (stop: Bibliothèque rue Mann), 325 (stop: Watt), 64 (stop: Tolbiac-Bibliothèque François Mitterrand)